I was very recently contacted by a friend/colleague who told me about this article ‘Mussel Myth an open and shut case’ by Dr Karl Kruszelnicki and she then brought up the small piece I wrote for Epicure in The Age last year about mussels. If a mussel is shut it doesn’t mean you should toss it out because it’s off. A mussel is very clear about letting you know if it’s off (it will smell awful).

Peter Lillie from Bay Sea Farms has taken the article I wrote and is putting it up at his stall where he sells at the Mt Eliza Farmers Market and the Pier at Mt Martha as he has been giving product away to make up for people’s ‘bad ones’.

Mussels are a sustainable, delicious and easy-to-cook choice (very reasonably priced too), so consider the mussel whether they’re open…or shut.

Here is the passage about Mussels from the Season’s Bounty column in Epicure The Age from last year.

Mussels

From a sustainability perspective mussels are a great choice; the methods used to farm them have little environmental impact, they are filter feeders so take their nutrients from the water in which they’re grown and they are very affordable. The major fallacy about mussels is that if they don’t open they are dead or bad and have to be tossed out. This isn’t true. If a mussel is bad it’s going to smell, really bad. When cooking, mussels thrive in a big pot with liquid that will highlight the meat rather than overwhelm it. Classic combinations of garlic, white onion and white wine finished with fresh parsley are simply a matter of placing the onion and garlic in the bottom of the pan with some olive oil, putting in the mussels, then a cup of the wine, covering with a lid and leaving for three minutes. Other flavours and liquids to cook mussels in include lager, orange juice and coriander; lime juice, chilli and vietnamese mint or coconut milk, thai basil, chicken stock and chilli.

Hilary McNevin

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