The sardine, I’ve said it before (and will do so again here) it’s a deliciously unctuous, omega-3 laiden, slightly salty, fleshy fish that’s insanely sustainable. The sardine is far from being over-fished and is very very inexpensive. It grills quickly and is lovely with a generous squeeze of lemon juice and can carry bigger flavours too, like garlic and chilli. Choosing sardines at the fish counter is a very sustainable, affordable, tasty choice.

Wine writer and sustainability advocate Max Allen has found what to drink with this small fish – a wine called Vermentino –  this is a grape variety from Sardinia that’s grown around the Mediterranean, its a sturdy grape that copes well in harsh climates and produces a crisp, dry wine that has some length and its own character along with a refreshing finish. It’s perfect for the Australian climate and there’s some beautiful Vermentino being made in Australia now. Max wrote a brilliant piece about the grape variety and its easy marriage with grilled sardines. He mused about the idea of allowing people to try this combination of oily, distinctive fish with some examples of Australian-made Vermentino. It could be considered a sustainable culinary solution (bloody clever I say!).

Australian winemakers who are making Vermentino liked what they read and Sardines & Vermentino The Musical ‘played’ its last gig today in Sydney after appearing in Adelaide Friday 21st January and Melbourne 24th January.

Tressle tables were piled high with different examples of the wine, tasting glasses and fleshy sardines deliciously grilled served next to them and it was all for free. Getting people to try Vermentino is what S&V The Musical was about and this sustainable feast of fish and white wine literally took the product to the streets.

Quite simply, you’d be mad not to try Vermentino – it’s readily available in bottle shops – it’s affordable and in the cooler months ahead I’m going to make a dish of linguine tossed with grilled sardines, lots of garlic, lemon zest, chilli, oregano, parsley perhaps a touch of a well-reduced tomato sugo and I’m going to try an Australian Vermentino with it – anyone care to join me?

Here are the winemakers who took their haul to three cities in 5 days to allow people a taste of their Vermentino.

919 Wines, Boyntons, Brown Brothers, Chalmers, De Bortoli, Ducks in a Row, Foxey’s Hangout, Mitolo, Trentham Estate and Yalumba

Get tasting!

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